openSUSE Board Chair: Nearly Pulled Plug on Distro in 2015

openSUSE logo

©2017 Michael McCallister

Richard Brown, chair of the openSUSE Linux Community Board, reported to the openSUSE Support list this week that after the release of v13.2 in 2014 he “was faced with the very real and depressing problem of having to find a way of informing the community that there would be no more releases of the openSUSE Distribution.”

Brown wrote that “the Project was struggling to find volunteers to actually help produce the distribution” dating back to the 12.2 release in the summer of 2012.

Background: Strategy and Audience

At around this same time (2010-11), the project leadership engaged the entire openSUSE community in a strategic planning exercise, covered here and here. The strategy was summarized in this paragraph:

The openSUSE project is a worldwide effort that promotes the use of Linux everywhere. The openSUSE community develops and maintains a packaging and distribution infrastructure which provides the foundation for the world’s most flexible and powerful Linux distribution. Our community works together in an open, transparent and friendly manner as part of the global Free and Open Source Software community.

It further defined the distribution’s target audience as “users who are interested in computers and want to get work done, experiment or learn. We offer a stable and enjoyable computing experience which does not limit freedom of choice; offering sane defaults and easy configuration.”

In an email exchange, Brown said that this discussion led to “conclusions end(ing) up being so generic they are not actionable.”

“In a vibrant community (which openSUSE is), open ended questions will lead to hundreds of responses, positive and negative, and forming consensus or conclusions from such noise is next to impossible.”

Brown’s account indicates that, even after the strategy and target audience was decided, the project continued to pursue a “Linux for everyone” audience. He wrote that while the distro had a “steady, loyal, and growing userbase,” new downloads (that is, new users) declined with every release.

Leaping Over the Crisis

openSUSE Leap logoWhat solved the distribution’s existential crisis was flipping the development cycle, using the commercial SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) code base as the basis for the stable periodic Leap distribution, and the Tumbleweed rolling release builds on each Leap release.

“Instead of openSUSE no longer having a stable distribution due to lack of contributor interest,” Brown wrote, “Leap has found new contributors in addition to the ones we effectively ‘stole’ by milking SUSE’s SLE efforts for everything they were worth. … And as a result Leap has been a bigger success than I had ever hoped for. ”

Note: Brown told me that the Tumbleweed rolling release would have continued, regardless of whether the “stable” release disappeared.

Today’s opensuse.org landing page just says openSUSE is:

The makers’ choice for sysadmins, developers and desktop users.

Brown later indicated a new document outlining the “Makers’ choice” strategy is in the works, and will be presented to the community “once we think we have a solid starting point for such discussions.”

A Few Thoughts

As a Member of the openSUSE Community,  I’m convinced the board and development team deserves kudos for rescuing this terrific distribution from its decline. As Brown told me, “We can’t appeal to (new users) when we advertise ourselves as ‘Linux for everybody’ – if we target everybody everywhere, we effectively target
nobody, nowhere.”

If you haven’t yet tried it, no matter what kind of computer user you are, come join our now-thriving community. I’ll be glad to help you.

 

©2017 Michael McCallister (contact)

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Plasma 5 live images for openSUSE and on the default openSUSE desktop | dennogumi.org

Source: www.dennogumi.org

Luca Beltrame of the openSUSE KDE team describes the current plans for integrating the Plasma 5 desktop into openSUSE. Long story short:

  • You can now download a “live ISO” to burn to DVD for testing on 64-bit systems.
  • At the end of April, Plasma 4 will be replaced by Plasma 5 Desktop and KDE Applications in the rolling Tumbleweed release.
  • Yet another reworking of the KDE software repositories: KDE:Frameworks hosts Plasma 5 and its libraries, KDE:Applications hosts the released programs, KDE:Extra has KDE/Qt ‘community packages’
  • No timetable on when Plasma 5 comes to the stable distribution (Good idea!).

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

Half a dozen reasons why openSUSE is a great OS for your PC

Here are a few reasons I use openSUSE and why its one of the best choices in the GNU/Linux world.

Source: www.itworld.com

Swapnil Bhartiya summarizes his reasons for using openSUSE. I could hardly improve on this text, and heartily approve.

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

In praise of open source communities

English: Conceptual Map of the FLOSS (Free/Lib...
Conceptual Map of the FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software) Polski: Konceptualna mapa FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One of the best things about free and open source software (FOSS), and Linux in particular, is the community spirit. Many of the people who use and build these bits of code are genuinely passionate and dedicated to the products and projects they are involved in.

In the FOSS world, a development team is the core of the community, and the symbol of one’s demonstrated ability is the right to commit source code to the core software. Bigger communities, like openSUSE and Ubuntu, have structures for other community contributors.

The openSUSE Project logo
The openSUSE Project logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’ve been a proud member of the openSUSE Community since nearly the beginning in 2007. To be a community member, the openSUSE project board of directors confirms your “continued and substantial contribution to the project.” My primary contribution was having written openSUSE Linux Unleashed and the many posts I’ve written on openSUSE and other FOSS topics. Learn more about the openSUSE Community here.

Tux, the Linux penguin
Tux, the Linux penguin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Goes to show how wired in I am to the world of Ubuntu, but I completely missed Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day yesterday. I’ve been involved with (mostly as an observer) the Ubuntu community for the last year or two, but I’ve played with Ubuntu regularly for much longer.

Ubuntu has a similar membership process as openSUSE, described at the Ubuntu Community site. Someday, I hope to join this community as well.

While I will not suggest for a moment that these communities are electronic Lake Wobegons, peaceful and friendly at all times, I will say that I typically find them helpful places. Then again, occasionally fights break out over issues like systemd (like this one, that ran for over a month!) religious wars between distributions, desktops, and text editors, and whatever else annoys people on a given day.

As we approach Thanksgiving in the United States, it’s a good time to think about giving back to your favorite open source software. A long time ago, I had some suggestions for working with free software if you don’t code. Many of the items on the list involve contributing to the community (filing bugs, getting help, giving help) and overall the list still looks pretty good to me.

If you’re already part of an open source community, you certainly have my appreciation, today and every day! If not, and you use the software, think about giving back.

Ooh, Shiny, or Why I Can’t Get Caught Up

If you’ve spent an appreciable amount of time with me (or this blog), you’ve probably heard me complain about having too much to do. Three years ago, I even pleaded for help finding an effective project management tool to help me juggle my life. It didn’t work. I couldn’t even find the time to look at my options. The project still sits in MyLifeOrganized, waiting its turn after 1116 days. My Uncompleted Tasks list now has 2,343 items on it. I think that’s the first time I’ve actually looked at that number, so I’ve not been stressing out about it.

The routine maintenance that keeps my computer running, and the lawn mowed, and the sinks relatively unclogged, it eats a lot of time. I’m even pretty good at checking off boxes in the average week (my Completed list is pretty sizable, too).  But that isn’t the real problem. It’s all the new stuff that software developers and other creative minds keep pumping out that I just have to try out.

Stuff to try

Consider these items in my list:

  • In the last two weeks, I’ve been invited to two brand new social networks, still in beta.You’ve probably heard of one (ello), but probably not Biosgraphy.
  • I also got an invitation to Google Inbox, which I’ve experimented with in the last week.
  • A week ago, I blogged about the just-released Firefox Developer Edition, which I’ve downloaded and installed, but really have yet to try.
  • Nearly forgot about the Google Web Starter Kit
  • You know that my favorite Linux distributions (openSUSE and Ubuntu) released new versions recently.
  • I’ve even installed the Windows 10 Preview, and ran it … twice.
  • Today, I read about OSJourno, a version of Fedora Linux specifically designed for journalists, and I’m dying to try it out.
  • Not too long ago, the folks at GitHub announced a “hackable text editor” called Atom. A couple of weeks ago, they had an alpha version of same for Windows. I’m downloading it now, with the help of a brand-new package manager called Chocolatey. Then I have to check my Linux distros to see if any of them have an Atom build available.
  • Think I mentioned this before, but to round things out, I’m still learning Scrivener with the help of some videos from the Scrivener Coach.

Stuff to Learn

Then there are the tools and technologies I really should learn more about:

  • Simplified markup (Asciidoc, Markdown, Textile). I’m told it takes 10 minutes to learn these commands.
  • Web development languages: JavaScript, Python, PHP and the like
  • My MOOCs: Cryptography, Data Journalism
  • The Learnable course catalog

Yep, it’s definitely time for me to prune the list, but in the meantime, could all you creative people stop making cool new products? Please?

This may be a plea for help. Advice on what to do next, and how to solve these problems are much appreciated. I’m not close to “losing it,” but the time may come.