Coming Attractions

A reasonable amount of planning went into the posts for National Blog Post Month this year. Since some of them didn’t quite get done, we’ve got some good stuff in the pipeline to share in the coming weeks. As a way to shamelessly beg to keep all my new readers around, here’s what’s coming up soon at Notes from the Metaverse:

  • What’s Next for Firefox? This weekend, Frederic Lardinois at TechCrunch asked this question. From one outsider to another, I’ve got some thoughts on this.
  • A more complete review of Firefox Developer Edition, following up on my earlier quick look.
  • Biosgraphy and ello: Two newcomers to the social/blogging arena.
  • Playing with text editors: Text editors are a religious matter for some developers. After using the programmable text editor Atom for a bit, I hope to have some useful things to say about it.
  • The new crop of electronic magazines covering Linux: Linux Voice, the
    English: Full Circle Magazine Logo

    Full Circle Magazine Logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    crowdsourced UK-based magazine is nearing its first anniversary. I’ve recently also become familiar with Full Circle Magazine (an Ubuntu-focused title) and FOSS Force.

  • Tux, the Linux penguin

    (Sorry, can’t ever resist) Tux, the Linux penguin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    I’ll still look for more community-based efforts (like the KDE Gardeners) to make free software better.

  • If my ambition to use all seven openSUSE Desktop Environment actually happens, I’ll surely write about it.

Usual disclaimers apply: Forward looking statements are not hard commitments. Other topics may intervene in the meantime. Also check MichaelMcCallister.com for posts about writing, building author platforms and the like.

Hope you have a terrific December!

Firefox Developer Edition: A Quick Look

So I’ve spent the evening playing with the Firefox Developer Edition, and watching Nikita

English: Cropped image of Richard Nixon and Ni...

Cropped image of Richard Nixon and Nikita Khrushchev debating at the American National Exhibition in Moscow, 1959, part of what came to be known as the Kitchen Debate. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Khrushchev tour the US on American Experience on PBS. Firefox is fun, and pretty interesting. Though I have to admit it took me a little while to find the Developer Tools that makes it different. I still just play at developer in my spare time.

Developer Edition comes with a Web console that sits at the bottom of the browser, and a standalone Browser Console window (below) that reports on the current page that you’re working on.

Firefox Browser Console

Firefox Developer Edition Browser Console

The Developer Toolbar is actually the start of a “highly usable command line for web developers.”  Here’s the help file with available commands:

Firefox Developer Toolbar

The Developer Toolbar is really just a command line.

I suspect there’s more to come, but it’s nearly bedtime. Until tomorrow… share any experiences you have with Firefox Developer Edition or your favorite web development/design tool.

Ten Years On: Mozilla, Firefox and the Developer Edition

English: This is a icon for Firefox Web Browser.

Firefox Web Browser. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A decade ago, the Mozilla project was in something of a crisis. The once-dominant browser (a direct descendant of Mosaic, the first graphical browser) had long ago been surpassed in usage by Microsoft Internet Explorer, in part the result of Microsoft’s leveraging its dominant operating system to recapture the Internet.

Mozilla was born when Netscape Communicator‘s code opened up to the global developer community, the first piece of “household name” software to go from proprietary to open source code. But the simple browser had become a full-blown suite of communication tools — Email, chat, even a web development environment. All of these tools loaded at once, clogging up computer memory (slowing down computers) and chewing up dial-up bandwidth (slowing down the web). Mozilla needed a strategy to keep the project from spiraling into oblivion.

Kudos to the person who had the idea to split up all the tools, and allow people to run just what they wanted. Thus, Firefox was born! This was the first of the lean browsers, lightning fast for its time, both for loading pages and simply displaying on the screen. Firefox also introduced the idea of modular extensions, allowing independent developers to add functionality to the basic browser engine provided by Mozilla.

Mozilla’s email client became Thunderbird, and won many fans. The web coding tool, Composer, spun off into a series of different applications, none of which ever became popular. Because the code was still open source, even the suite continued under the SeaMonkey banner. All this code runs on practically every operating system known to humans and bots, including the Firefox OS for mobile devices.

Firefox reignited the browser wars, and eventually eclipsed Internet Explorer by out-innovating Microsoft. As a result, Google got into the browser business with Chrome. These days, Chrome is at the top of the browser pile, with Firefox, Apple’s Safari and IE  trailing. As with many things Google, Chrome is a proprietary browser running atop open source code, called Chromium.

Today, the Firefox team released the Firefox Developer Edition, a special browser with built-in tools for both the mobile OS and ordinary web designers and developers. I’ve got this downloaded, and hope to learn more about it in the coming days (if you’ve read through all my NaBloPoMo posts this month, you’ll know that I’ve got a lot of learning ahead of me).

Meanwhile, I continue to use Firefox as my primary browser, in part because of its open character, in part out of habit. Happy Birthday Firefox!