Questions and answers: Ubuntu bq tablet – TechRepublic

After Jack Wallen’s recent review of the bq Aquaris M10 tablet, he was hit with a number of questions about the tablet. Jack addresses some of those questions to help you decide if the Ubuntu tablet is a worthy investment.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.techrepublic.com

Tech Republic’s Jack Wallen answers questions about the Ubuntu tablet, which he’s wild about.

See on Scoop.itUbuntu Touch Phones and Tablets

7 things you should know about openSUSE Leap

Leap is to SUSE what CentOS is to Red Hat and Ubuntu is to Canonical…

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.itworld.com

Swapnil Bhartiya offers another interpretation of what Leap means for both ordinary users and enterprises. Need a rock-solid enterprise server? Leap can do that. Like playing around with different desktop environments without having to install separate flavors like Ubuntu? Use Leap’s pattern system (though this has been an openSUSE feature for many years).

I’m not sure I completely understand his explanation of the update paths (the inevitable push/pull of stability vs. latest-and-greatest), but I’ll be looking closely at that while I play around.

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

OpenSUSE Leap fuses enterprise-grade stability with cutting-edge software

Over the last year, the OpenSUSE community transformed its development process and now promises us “the first hybrid Linux distribution”—OpenSUSE Leap.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.pcworld.com

Nice review of Leap 42.1 from Chris Hoffman at PC World. Focuses on the new development process (SLE to openSUSE instead of the other way around).

I’ll be installing Leap this weekend. Looking forward to telling you what I think.

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

Missing NaBloPoMo

For the last few Novembers, I’ve been posting at a feverish pace (for me, anyway) as part of National Blog Posting Month (NaBloPoMo). The goal is to post every day this month as a way to jump-start your writing and building an audience.

So this year, I’ve got too much going on, I’m afraid. Got some projects that may soon come to fruition, and I’ll be able to talk about them when we get there.

Tomorrow, I’ll be downloading a fresh copy of openSUSE Linux, now called openSUSE Leap 42.1, which I’m really excited about. I’m tidying up my current copy in breathless anticipation. This follows the (coincidental) installation of Firefox v42 today. As I tweeted earlier today (with the unforgivable error of getting Douglas Adams’ name wrong):

It’s a common lament: I wish I had more time to blog. What really bums me out is that I get a real good rhythm going during NaBloPoMo, and then I lose that momentum over the holidays. So I’m going to try something different this year, though I don’t really know what that will be yet.

Just because I’m not doing it, it’s not too late for you to start! November is a great time to start (or kick-start) your blogging habit. Click here to register. There are prizes!

If you participate, drop a link in the comments below.

Go look at some of my previous NaBloPoMo posts.

Quick Thunderbird Tip: Repairing Mail Summary Files

English: Mozilla Thunderbird (SuSe Linux 9.3/K...
Mozilla Thunderbird (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Couple of weeks ago, my Thunderbird mail client stopped connecting to Yahoo Mail. It would log in to the service, start downloading Message 1 of X — and hang. When it snapped back to normal, it reported there was no mail to download. Hmm…

After a few false starts, I found an old MozillaZine forum post that pointed to the Mail Summary File as the culprit. The MSF generates the list of emails on your Inbox, with date, time and read/unread status. The forum post said Go to your profile and find any files with an *.msf extension. Delete them, it said. So I did.

This turned out half-right. See, I like to think I’m pretty well-organized, with a bunch of topic-based folders and filters that move mail into those folders. Thunderbird (rightly) produces MSF files for each of these folders. When you delete them all, Thunderbird has trouble downloading into possibly nonexistent folders and it complains intensely.

For this reason, more recent versions of Thunderbird has a Repair function in the Properties of each folder. This tool reconstructs the Mail Summary File without having to drop the original. How do you do that?

  1. Right-click your Inbox and choose Properties from the menu.
  2. Click Repair Folder. The folder display switches to the cover page while the Repair tool is active. Depending on the size of the folder (and/or what the problem might be), this can take some time. Don’t try clicking on the folder until the repair is done.
  3. When the repair is complete, you’ll return to the message list, with the proper number of Unread messages counted on the left side. You can then click OK to close out the Folder Properties table.

If you still have trouble with downloading mail, or processing filters, try running this Repair tool on other folders.

Hope this is helpful.