Questions and answers: Ubuntu bq tablet – TechRepublic

After Jack Wallen’s recent review of the bq Aquaris M10 tablet, he was hit with a number of questions about the tablet. Jack addresses some of those questions to help you decide if the Ubuntu tablet is a worthy investment.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.techrepublic.com

Tech Republic’s Jack Wallen answers questions about the Ubuntu tablet, which he’s wild about.

See on Scoop.itUbuntu Touch Phones and Tablets

7 things you should know about openSUSE Leap

Leap is to SUSE what CentOS is to Red Hat and Ubuntu is to Canonical…

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.itworld.com

Swapnil Bhartiya offers another interpretation of what Leap means for both ordinary users and enterprises. Need a rock-solid enterprise server? Leap can do that. Like playing around with different desktop environments without having to install separate flavors like Ubuntu? Use Leap’s pattern system (though this has been an openSUSE feature for many years).

I’m not sure I completely understand his explanation of the update paths (the inevitable push/pull of stability vs. latest-and-greatest), but I’ll be looking closely at that while I play around.

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

OpenSUSE Leap fuses enterprise-grade stability with cutting-edge software

Over the last year, the OpenSUSE community transformed its development process and now promises us “the first hybrid Linux distribution”—OpenSUSE Leap.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.pcworld.com

Nice review of Leap 42.1 from Chris Hoffman at PC World. Focuses on the new development process (SLE to openSUSE instead of the other way around).

I’ll be installing Leap this weekend. Looking forward to telling you what I think.

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

Missing NaBloPoMo

For the last few Novembers, I’ve been posting at a feverish pace (for me, anyway) as part of National Blog Posting Month (NaBloPoMo). The goal is to post every day this month as a way to jump-start your writing and building an audience.

So this year, I’ve got too much going on, I’m afraid. Got some projects that may soon come to fruition, and I’ll be able to talk about them when we get there.

Tomorrow, I’ll be downloading a fresh copy of openSUSE Linux, now called openSUSE Leap 42.1, which I’m really excited about. I’m tidying up my current copy in breathless anticipation. This follows the (coincidental) installation of Firefox v42 today. As I tweeted earlier today (with the unforgivable error of getting Douglas Adams’ name wrong):

It’s a common lament: I wish I had more time to blog. What really bums me out is that I get a real good rhythm going during NaBloPoMo, and then I lose that momentum over the holidays. So I’m going to try something different this year, though I don’t really know what that will be yet.

Just because I’m not doing it, it’s not too late for you to start! November is a great time to start (or kick-start) your blogging habit. Click here to register. There are prizes!

If you participate, drop a link in the comments below.

Go look at some of my previous NaBloPoMo posts.

openSUSE Leap Second milestone expected soon – Release schedule posted

Sourced through Scoop.it from: news.opensuse.org

Milestone 2: September 4

Package/Artwork due: September 20

Beta 1: September 24

Release Candidate 1: October 15

Gold Master (ISO ready to go): October 30

Formal Release: November 4 (at SUSECon Amsterdam)

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

Work begins on totally new openSUSE release

Deep thought and some additional core SUSE Linux Enterprise source code have given The openSUSE Project a path forward for future releases.

The change is so phenomenal that the project is building a whole new release.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: news.opensuse.org

Douglas Adams told us that the answer to the question of Life, the Universe and Everything was “42.” The openSUSE team wants you to start thinking that by this fall, you’ll find that you’ll find the answers to your computing problems in its “42” release.

Actually, the number represents the project in the Open Build Service, but it certainly resonates nicely with the “geeko” community that openSUSE has been building over the last decade.

Release manager Stephan “Coolo”” Kulow says the first milestone will be ready “soon.” I’ll be psyched to see it.

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

Digital Democracy is Not a Spectator Sport

Been reading a lot lately on one of my favorite topics: How to realize the democratic promise of the Internet.

You have to do more than vote periodically to call yourself a citizen. Especially true when it comes to the Internet, where no one really votes to decide on the critical issues.

That’s why the impending US Federal Communications Commission vote on net neutrality is so important — because we all had a role in moving the bureaucrats toward the right answer.

That’s not what I’m on about today, though. There’s a convergence of coincidences to tell you about.

Consent of the Networked

Sunday, I finished Consent of the Networked, Rebecca MacKinnon’s book from 2012 (and an update for the 2013 paperback edition) about the “worldwide struggle for Internet freedom.” MacKinnon is a former CNN correspondent in China that now manages Global Voices Online. This is a good, if occasionally dated, outline of the various battlegrounds facing human right activists when taking their struggles online.

centre

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As is typical of these types of books, it closes out with a manifesto intended to describe the perfect online world. These are usually quite inspiring, but lacking in ways of getting from here to there. While I don’t agree with everything MacKinnon wrote in these pages, she does indeed realize that without a social movement, we won’t ever get her manifesto realized, or anyone else’s vision. Democracy isn’t a spectator sport.

(Something else I’m not on about today, but might be some other time: In a perfect world, the global Internet might be rightfully managed by a global organization that might have a name like the International Telecommunications Union. MacKinnon persuades me that in this world, that’s a really bad idea.)

MacKinnon proves her commitment to this principle (of action) by maintaining the book’s website consentofthenetworked.com, years after its publication. She blogs actively there, but more importantly she maintains a directory of digital democracy activist organizations on the Get Involved! tab of the site. I know it’s real and current because some of the listed organizations weren’t born yet when the paperback came out.

Building a Bottom-Up Internet Movement

Monday, I was going to begin working my way through the list to find places for information and the best places to channel my own energies, but then this piece on Medium showed up in my news feed. It’s called “Building an Internet Movement from the Bottom Up” by Tim Karr, one of the leaders of Free Press. Fabulous essay, with a couple of very important reminders:

It’s a fight not playing out between smartphone packing protesters and security forces, but among the Internet governance community — a globe-trotting tribe of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), international agencies, world leaders and corporate CEOs.

For as long as the World Wide Web has existed these groups have debated its control and administration. What rules should govern a network that transcends national boundaries to connect people everywhere?

It’s a discussion — replete with international agency acronyms and jargon (“multistakeholderism” anyone?) — that leaves the rest of us scratching our heads.

and there’s a new coalition of civil society organizations:

The coalition is organized on the belief that the Internet must evolve in the public interest with the full participation of the billions of Internet users who aren’t in the mix at Davos.

It plans to build a global network of grassroots groups that can better organize and amplify the concerns of those people often on the wrong side of the digital divide. The group plans also to convene the first Internet Social Forum later this year.

And hey, there’s going to be another manifesto developed! But not just out of a single mind, this will be (theoretically) the result of a crowdsourced process over the coming months. With a global coalition of organizations that (theoretically) will commit to realizing it.

I hope there’s some way for folks like me to get involved in this process, though. Seems focused (for now) on organizations.

Will follow this process closely. Let’s make it work!

Notepad++: A Very Special Software Update

I opened my Notepad++ text editor and got a most interesting surprise. It told me there was an update available, and did I want it? That’s not unusual; but what happened next certainly was.

The software quickly updated, and (again as usual) asked me if I wanted to run it. When it opened, the following text magically typed itself into a fresh file:

Notepad++ Je Suis Charlie ediiton

Notepad++ Je Suis Charlie edition

Pretty darn cool. I salute the Notepad++ team, and all who have taken a stand for free speech, free press and free expression.

Apparently the Notepad++ developers paid a small price for this tiny bit of courage. Read the linked article and the Related Articles below.

Je Suis Charlie: Long Live the Global Free Press!

Je Suis Charlie

Some random and probably disjointed thoughts on Wednesday’s events in Paris. As a onetime journalist (and a lifelong news junkie) I’m still a little numb.

Satire is a hard business. Just ask Jon Stewart, Bassem Youssef, or any Onion writer. Editorial cartooning is even harder, as it is part of the point to draw a hard and unmistakable line. I won’t pretend that I’ve ever read Charlie Hebdo, in translation or in French. Yet it’s clear that we must stand in solidarity with them, for they were brave and uncompromising.

My union is among the 35 journalism groups on board with Charlie:

Writers Groups Back Charlie HebdoDan Gillmor has tweeted a bunch of useful things today. Here’s my favorite:

My hometown newspaper, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, had two editorial cartoonists for years after the morning and afternoon papers merged. A year or so ago, they dumped the last full-timer, in favor of two syndicated editorial cartoons a day (usually one just left-of-center and the other just right-of-center). A month ago, they dropped the separate op-ed page and drastically cut the number of letters they published. Oh, and there’s just one syndicated cartoon left. It will probably be on the right side of free expression, but in a relatively bland and inoffensive way.

So spend some time with your favorite satirists today, and recommit to exercising your freedom of expression. Start a blog!

If you haven’t got a favorite satirist, you can start with a couple more of my favorite satirists (feel free to share your favorites in the Comments):

Book Review: “The Art of Social Media: Power Tips for Power Users”

Art of Social Media coverNow I know all of you already have Build Your Author Platform: The New Rules and gotten copies for all your friends and family who want to be successful writers. Perhaps you’re thinking “Mike, that book is seven months old! Isn’t there something more recent?” Yes, we’re all still on Internet time. Maybe you’re not a writer, but still want to master social media to build awareness of your business, your cause…maybe even your thirst for celebrity. I’ve got an idea for you.

The team of Guy Kawasaki and Peg Fitzpatrick have mastered social media as well as, or better than, just about anyone. It doesn’t hurt that Kawasaki is a tech marketing legend (Apple, Motorola and the like), but the 123 tips included in The Art of Social Media will be useful to anyone who wants to gather a following on the Internet.

Guy Kawasaki and Peg Fitzpatrick, authors of The Art of Social Media

Guy Kawasaki and Peg Fitzpatrick, authors of “The Art of Social Media”

This easy read (I think I knocked it out in 3-4 sessions) is less focused on services, but the principles shared will help you develop an overall social media strategy. When the Next Big Buzz social platform makes its appearance, you should be able to master it quickly.

This is not to say that you don’t learn a lot about Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, SlideShare, Google+ and Pinterest. You’ll pick up stuff about optimizing posts for each of these platforms, mastering the use of hashtags across services, and trying to understand how each platform adds stuff to your newsfeed.

Among the truths unlocked:

  • “There are only two kinds of people on social media: those who want more followers and those who are lying.”
  • The key to getting more followers? “Share Good Stuff”
  • Using social media to popularize events
  • Don’t just slap your presentation slides on SlideShare; make sure the slides are self-explanatory.

I am happy to say that Kawasaki and Fitzpatrick don’t contradict anything Carole Jelen and I said in Build Your Author Platform. I’ll also say that I learned things from this book. As a result, you may see more of me on Pinterest. You’ll learn new things too, no matter how far along you are in your social media journey.