Plasma 5 live images for openSUSE and on the default openSUSE desktop | dennogumi.org

Source: www.dennogumi.org

Luca Beltrame of the openSUSE KDE team describes the current plans for integrating the Plasma 5 desktop into openSUSE. Long story short:

  • You can now download a “live ISO” to burn to DVD for testing on 64-bit systems.
  • At the end of April, Plasma 4 will be replaced by Plasma 5 Desktop and KDE Applications in the rolling Tumbleweed release.
  • Yet another reworking of the KDE software repositories: KDE:Frameworks hosts Plasma 5 and its libraries, KDE:Applications hosts the released programs, KDE:Extra has KDE/Qt ‘community packages’
  • No timetable on when Plasma 5 comes to the stable distribution (Good idea!).

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

Half a dozen reasons why openSUSE is a great OS for your PC

Here are a few reasons I use openSUSE and why its one of the best choices in the GNU/Linux world.

Source: www.itworld.com

Swapnil Bhartiya summarizes his reasons for using openSUSE. I could hardly improve on this text, and heartily approve.

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

Another stroll down memory lane: KDE4’s mis-introduction

While writing yesterday’s milestone post, I realized I failed to mention the most popular post (by far) in the history of this blog, also known as the day I was linked to by DistroWatch Weekly.

Past as prologue

English: Logo of the KDE Project "KDE, K ...
Logo of the KDE Project “KDE, K Desktop Environment and the KDE Logo are trademarks of KDE e.V” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Curiously enough, that post topic echoes Tuesday’s post on the openSUSE 13.2 release. You see, openSUSE 11.0 was released in June 2008 to much fanfare, in part because the new version of the KDE desktop was included in the release. KDE 4.0 was  what we now  commonly call a “technical preview,” not really ready for production. Nonetheless, openSUSE allowed users the choice to install the “old” KDE 3.5 desktop, the new KDE 4.0 desktop, or the continuing GNOME 2 desktop. Despite some warnings that KDE 4 was not quite ready for everyday use, some folks installed it anyway. Pandemonium ensued on the support lists.

In this post, “openSUSE 11.0 and KDE 4,” I offered my take on the “crisis.” In brief, people needed to think about their systems before installing major new components. There was blame to be shared, but just because Linux folks were used to working with applications with version numbers of 0.4 didn’t mean that everything would always work perfectly.

KDE 4.3 desktop, showing Dolphin, KMail and a ...
KDE 4.3 desktop, showing Dolphin, KMail and a selection of desktop widgets. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Apparently someone at the DistroWatch site (a place to learn about Linux distributions) thought I had something to say, and two days later, hundreds of folks were dropping by. The post sparked some interesting conversation in the comments as well. For a blogger, things rarely could get better.

Eventually, KDE 4 became eminently workable, and pretty darn cool. While some folks never got over the shock of the bad rollout (and still complain about how terrible KDE is now), KDE development continues apace. Sometime in the last few years, the Trinity project launched to recreate  KDE 3.5. I’ve heard they found it difficult to reproduce on modern systems. So it goes.

KDE Plasma 5: Don’t say you weren’t warned

Much has changed in KDE since 2008. With openSUSE 13.2, another new KDE desktop, based on the KDE 5 Framework is included with the distribution. But it’s not one of he options in the install. Many will set it up separately to play with, but much of the code won’t work side-by-side with KDE 4. A lesson learned.

As the month of November continues, I’ll have more to say about all these topics (openSUSE, KDE 4 and KDE 5). I’m still planning to try all the other supported desktops. Maybe I’ll have a new favorite by the end of the month. Stranger things have happened!

Got any memories of the KDE 4 rollout? How about GNOME 3, which didn’t go a lot better for some users? Let me know in the comments!

Elect openSUSE 13.2 Today

Not to be redundant, but if you live in the United States and it’s still Tuesday, November 4, 2014, you should finish voting before coming back here to read. Polls close, but this collection of words will be here for eternity. Folks younger than 18: you’re excused, but the rest of you…

Now, no matter where you live, or how old you are, you’re reading this on a computer of some sort. If that computer is an Intel-based desktop or laptop, it’s your lucky day: you can upgrade your system to openSUSE 13.2!

While I’ve played with the beta for a couple of weeks, the update server downloaded and installed some 3100+ upgraded software packages to my computer last night (hours ahead of the official release). I’ll be stress-testing the system watching election returns (video, radio, live-blogs, whatever else I can use to feed the news junkie).

First, choose a desktop

You probably want to know what’s new with this release. The openSUSE News team can enlighten you. Also, J. A. Watson at ZDNet goes hands-on here. I’ll be doing a similar review once it’s fully baked.

openSUSE 13.2 Welcome screen
openSUSE 13.2 Welcome screen

Among the favorite things Linux brings you generally is an abundance of choices, and it begins with your desktop environment. This distribution offers seven different ways to organize your daily work. As a KDE guy from day one, I’m really looking forward to trying some of the newer options.

Mate is one of the alternatives to GNOME 3.x, and one of our Greek openSUSE Ambassadors explains how to install it on your new openSUSE system (he starts from the beginning too).

You want a download link? Happy to oblige: Download openSUSE 13.2.

Polls are closing in the east soon as I type this, so I’ve got to start feeding the beast. More on openSUSE 13.2 as the month goes on.

Finding New Software in openSUSE: A New Way?

Amid the bad news of the openSUSE forums getting hit by an invader, came some potentially great news for future openSUSE users. Being the eternal optimist, I want to focus on the good stuff. Perhaps that begins by mentioning that the openSUSE forums are back up and running.

Earlier last week, longtime openSUSE developer Roger Luedecke proposed a new, more user-friendly “app store” for getting new software on openSUSE systems. Noting that the distribution already has a “halfway solution” to the problem of discovering and installing software on openSUSE at download.opensuse.org, Luedecke goes on to say (emphasis mine):

However, there are a number of areas where this interface falls short. The most glaring can be that often the applications lack a description or have one so short as to be nearly useless. Another significant point is the lack of user reviews. Reviews help flesh out things that may be missed in a description, as well as provide tips at a glance on what the new user should expect. I believe reviews would be reasonably easy to implement in the current domain, and getting more robust descriptions should not be terribly difficult.

Yet Another Shopping Cart?

Another problem with the current Download setup is that you have to find and run install packages one at a time. Luedecke believes (and I hope he’s right) that openSUSE could allow users to create a ‘cart’ to select a bunch of packages and then check out. The software would then package everything in the cart, downloading and installing it all with one set of confirmations. This would make installing new stuff from the web as easy as installing packages with the Zypper command line interface, or the YaST software management module.

YaST 2.12.27-2
YaST 2.12.27-2 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Good descriptions also simplifies the search for high-quality replacements. If it were up to me, I’d add an “Alternative to” field to the description, so people looking for a Photoshop replacement could easily find The GIMP (perhaps a lame, obvious example, but you know what I mean). The AlternativeTo site could offer a database to pluck from.

Reading through the comments on this post, you’ll find some responses from those resistant to change, but I really hope this happens in a reasonable time frame. Will keep an eye on this in the meantime.

Comment Fodder

If you’re a Linux user (of any distro): How do you discover and try out new free/open source software? Does your distribution make it easy to get new stuff that meets your changing needs?

If you don’t use Linux now: Do you worry that you won’t be able to find the type of software you need? Have you been frustrated when trying to find a replacement for your favorite application? Anything else holding you back?

 

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