More Time to Get Ready

So much for writing a daily post on WordPress 5.0/Gutenberg! I’m mostly managing to keep up with the plan to spend 15 minutes a day picking something up about the new release; mostly still a lot of reading. Writing about it is even harder to find time for.

Beginning to think a weekly roundup will do, but we’ll see if I can get more done this week.

Pushing Back the Release Date

Anyway, if you haven’t heard, we all have another week to get ready, as the WordPress 5.0 development team pushed back the release date from Monday, November 19 to Tuesday, November 27. It will be interesting to see if the date slips again.

It is my firm opinion that there is nothing magical about a release date. WordPress does not have to release a Gutenberg product so they can book a zillion sales by the end of the fiscal year. No one is anxiously awaiting the arrival of a shrink-wrapped copy of WordPress 5.0 under the tree in December. Matt Mullenweg has always maintained that Gutenberg would be released when it was ready. The team should stick to that.

On the other hand, Mullenweg told WordCamp Portland that “The hope is that the 5.0 release day is the most anti-climactic thing ever,” because so many sites have already decided to install Gutenberg, or stick with the Classic Editor (a version of the existing editor that is compatible with themes and plugins that are also Gutenberg-compatible). We can hope! I’m going to check out the video at WordCamp.tv too.

As I type this, I’m updating the Gutenberg plugin to v4.3. Still haven’t run into any trouble, but I haven’t exactly tried anything fancy yet.

Plan: Working Through “20+ Tips”

WPLift published a list of 20+ Tips for Gutenberg that will serve as a useful jumping off point for me, I think. Any technical article that starts with learning your way around the editor screen is an article that aims at being helpful to new users.

wordpress-gutenberg-editor-tips-1-1024x622

Alternative Editors?

While strolling through my Twitter feed last week, I saw this great chart from Birgit Pauli-Haack, and sent it around:

Of course, what this means is that if you decide you don’t like editing posts in Gutenberg (or Classic Editor, for that matter), you can use almost any word processor or gizmo that you can write with. Write in your preferred tool, copy and paste into the WordPress editor. See the complete chart in a readable version in the link to the Github project.

Birgit not only retweeted my retweet but also included it in this week’s Gutenberg Times update.

Well, back to testing the tips! If you’ve found something interesting and/or horrifying in your own Gutenberg tests, let me know in the Comments.

Previous Posts in the Series

Getting ready for Gutenberg

Getting Ready for Gutenberg: First Weekend

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.