Yes, you can communicate on Twitter!

I have a story to tell. There may be lessons to learn, but I guess we’ll see.

One Little Tweet

It started a few nights ago, when Twitter called my attention to this post by Zeynep Tufekci about Facebook:

She was responding to this post by someone you may have heard of:

I shared Dr Tufekci’s post, but thought it might be a little wordy, so I rephrased it a little:

See those numbers next to the heart and speech bubble? In the 11 years and 1 week I’ve been on Twitter, I don’t think I’ve gotten that kind of feedback for any single post. Twitter even followed up with an analytics report! Over 20,000 sets of eyeballs saw my little sentence! If you’re reading this post because you saw the tweet, Welcome!

But the endorphin-goosing traffic of social media love was just the beginning.

A Twitter Conversation

So while my iPod is giving me minute-by-minute updates of all the people who connected with my words (a wonderful thing to happen to any professional writer), I also suddenly receive feedback of a somewhat different sort: “Straight up wrong.”

At least it wasn’t a personal attack from some white nationalist. After my pride recovered a little, I offered a brief response:

BTW, Cory is a total stranger to me. He studies math in Stanford, California. If he goes to the school with the same name as the town, you might conclude that he’s way smarter than I am. You’d probably be right. It is still a little thrilling to have a conversation online about something — anything — important.

He responded:

I didn’t think I was pushing a “they don’t sell (data) at all anymore” idea, but rather something else:

If you think Twitter has become a place where conversation is no longer possible, and is only a place where conflict over politics gets ever more heated, I offer this small miracle in evidence:

Thanks, Cory Griffith! Mathematicians can still be human.

Conclusions

There is hope that the world can learn something from this Facebook atrocity. If we can have online conversations that don’t end in flame wars, that’s a great thing. If we can understand the real problem with Facebook’s vacuuming up of their users’ personal information, so much the better.

This isn’t the first time Facebook has gotten in hot water over this. It might be the last, but that’s up to us. That’s for another post, though. In the meantime, do read the Guardian story that Cory linked to when I was “straight up wrong.” They’ve been doing some fabulous work on this story overall. If you can, send them some cash to help pay the writers, editors, printers and web people too.

Let me close with the same words I finished my chat with Cory on:

Some questions come to mind: How did I handle this conversation? Is there something I could have done better? Have you been involved in online conversation, flame war, or something in between. What communication lessons can you share from them? Of course, comments on Facebook’s data practices and business model are welcome here (and on the Michael McCallister Facebook page) too.  

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One thought on “Yes, you can communicate on Twitter!

  1. “How did I handle this conversation?”

    It looks like both you and Cory handled it pretty well. Both of you acted like you were engaging with a real human being interested in exchanging ideas. I think that’s the key to communicating on Twitter.

    Note: if you engage with someone and it turns out they’re NOT interested in exchanging ideas — if all they want is to shout you down or launch ad hominem attacks — usually you can tell that pretty quickly, and then you simply disengage.

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