A History of OS/2 from Ars Technica

So after a weekend of fictional travel in time and space, it’s time for me to get back to the real world. Besides the deadlines I’m trying to meet (and/or update), there’s always interesting stuff that catches my eye.

The OS/2 Warp WorkPlaceShell desktop, from os2museum.com, by way of Ars Technica
The OS/2 Warp WorkPlaceShell desktop, from os2museum.com, by way of Ars Technica

Tonight I’m directing your attention to a new, semi-short (five web pages) history piece called Half an operating system: The triumph and tragedy of OS/2 by Jeremy Reimer at Ars Technica.

This is a story I wish I’d written. This IBM product was the first “alternative” operating system I ever used. I started typing first “non-Microsoft” OS, but knew immediately that the folks who were around back then (and those who read Reimer’s story) would know that’s not correct. That was true by the time I got around to using it (Warp 4 in 1996, when I was a technology reporter for Isthmus Weekly in Madison, WI), but its origins go back much deeper.

I’ve got a longer story to tell, but I’m afraid I don’t have time to tell it now. I will say that I still have my OS/2 Warp 4 box sitting in my office. Every time I install the VirtualBox virtual machine system, I always note that VB supports OS/2 VMs. Someday I’m going to test that assumption.

Did you run any version of OS/2? I’d love to hear your stories! Feel free to comment on the Ars story too.

 

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