Plasma 5 live images for openSUSE and on the default openSUSE desktop | dennogumi.org

Source: www.dennogumi.org

Luca Beltrame of the openSUSE KDE team describes the current plans for integrating the Plasma 5 desktop into openSUSE. Long story short:

  • You can now download a “live ISO” to burn to DVD for testing on 64-bit systems.
  • At the end of April, Plasma 4 will be replaced by Plasma 5 Desktop and KDE Applications in the rolling Tumbleweed release.
  • Yet another reworking of the KDE software repositories: KDE:Frameworks hosts Plasma 5 and its libraries, KDE:Applications hosts the released programs, KDE:Extra has KDE/Qt ‘community packages’
  • No timetable on when Plasma 5 comes to the stable distribution (Good idea!).

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

Half a dozen reasons why openSUSE is a great OS for your PC

Here are a few reasons I use openSUSE and why its one of the best choices in the GNU/Linux world.

Source: www.itworld.com

Swapnil Bhartiya summarizes his reasons for using openSUSE. I could hardly improve on this text, and heartily approve.

See on Scoop.itopenSUSE Desktop

Happy Net Neutrality Day!

People of the Internet, Rejoice!

It’s an important day in the history of the Internet. Despite enormous pressure from the Big Media corporations, the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) bowed to the democratic pressure of millions of Internet users. These users demanded strong protections against “slow lanes” for their network connections, and to preserve equal protection for all content traveling across the public Internet.

I’ve written about this before, most recently just after President Barack Obama came out for “the strongest possible protection for net neutrality.” If you’re confused by this whole thing, I hope that piece will help clarify things for you.

Net Neutrality: 3 corporations vs every other personSpeaking of confusing, some of the arguments made today against the plan were … interesting. For months, Republican legislators have been denouncing a plan to change the way Internet domain names are allocated around the world as “Obama’s plan to give away the Internet.” Did you notice how today, some opponents of strong net neutrality rules called this “Obama’s secret plan to control the Internet.”

A Couple of Thoughts on the Meeting

It’s worth spending some time watching the FCC meeting video. The FCC’s two opponents of strong net neutrality spent much of their debate time defending assorted companies that would be hurt by these rules. They also suggested that the public had not been heard on the matter. It was almost a breathtaking attempt to pretend that the 4 million responses to the original (far less neutral) rule presented last May didn’t exist.

That said, I agree with two things Ajit Pai and Mike O’Rielly said. There should have been more public hearings where ordinary people could speak to the commissioners directly. Like other advocates for net neutrality, I’m pretty confident we would have won that battle too.

I also don’t exactly see why Commission chair Tom Wheeler couldn’t have released the new proposal a few days ago. It’s a new era; people expect transparency. And there’s no doubt few minds would have changed in the process.

Time to Celebrate

I loved this tweet from Anil Dash:

One year ago, every person I know who understands the FCC or internet policy considered net neutrality dead. But the people were heard.

https://twitter.com/anildash/status/571007947498774528

It’s the truth. A salute to the organizations that even opponents conceded had led the fight:

Folks I’m probably forgetting too.

Ain’t Over Yet, Though

Corporations just don’t lie down when they’ve been defeated. We still have the best Congress money can buy. Courts too. As the founders used to say, “The price of liberty is eternal vigilance.” So connect with the groups above, and we’ll win more victories!

Create Custom News Streams Based on Your Specific Sources and Filters

News defined by you.

Source: www.defcomb.com

If you’re a nonfiction writer (or even a fiction writer who addresses real-world topics), you need to keep up with the latest news in your field of expertise. @Robin Goodtells us about Defcomb, a new curation tool that finds material on the web relevant to your oh-so-specific needs. I look forward to trying it.

See on Scoop.itBuild Your Author Platform: New Rules

Digital Democracy is Not a Spectator Sport

Been reading a lot lately on one of my favorite topics: How to realize the democratic promise of the Internet.

You have to do more than vote periodically to call yourself a citizen. Especially true when it comes to the Internet, where no one really votes to decide on the critical issues.

That’s why the impending US Federal Communications Commission vote on net neutrality is so important — because we all had a role in moving the bureaucrats toward the right answer.

That’s not what I’m on about today, though. There’s a convergence of coincidences to tell you about.

Consent of the Networked

Sunday, I finished Consent of the Networked, Rebecca MacKinnon’s book from 2012 (and an update for the 2013 paperback edition) about the “worldwide struggle for Internet freedom.” MacKinnon is a former CNN correspondent in China that now manages Global Voices Online. This is a good, if occasionally dated, outline of the various battlegrounds facing human right activists when taking their struggles online.

centre

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As is typical of these types of books, it closes out with a manifesto intended to describe the perfect online world. These are usually quite inspiring, but lacking in ways of getting from here to there. While I don’t agree with everything MacKinnon wrote in these pages, she does indeed realize that without a social movement, we won’t ever get her manifesto realized, or anyone else’s vision. Democracy isn’t a spectator sport.

(Something else I’m not on about today, but might be some other time: In a perfect world, the global Internet might be rightfully managed by a global organization that might have a name like the International Telecommunications Union. MacKinnon persuades me that in this world, that’s a really bad idea.)

MacKinnon proves her commitment to this principle (of action) by maintaining the book’s website consentofthenetworked.com, years after its publication. She blogs actively there, but more importantly she maintains a directory of digital democracy activist organizations on the Get Involved! tab of the site. I know it’s real and current because some of the listed organizations weren’t born yet when the paperback came out.

Building a Bottom-Up Internet Movement

Monday, I was going to begin working my way through the list to find places for information and the best places to channel my own energies, but then this piece on Medium showed up in my news feed. It’s called “Building an Internet Movement from the Bottom Up” by Tim Karr, one of the leaders of Free Press. Fabulous essay, with a couple of very important reminders:

It’s a fight not playing out between smartphone packing protesters and security forces, but among the Internet governance community — a globe-trotting tribe of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), international agencies, world leaders and corporate CEOs.

For as long as the World Wide Web has existed these groups have debated its control and administration. What rules should govern a network that transcends national boundaries to connect people everywhere?

It’s a discussion — replete with international agency acronyms and jargon (“multistakeholderism” anyone?) — that leaves the rest of us scratching our heads.

and there’s a new coalition of civil society organizations:

The coalition is organized on the belief that the Internet must evolve in the public interest with the full participation of the billions of Internet users who aren’t in the mix at Davos.

It plans to build a global network of grassroots groups that can better organize and amplify the concerns of those people often on the wrong side of the digital divide. The group plans also to convene the first Internet Social Forum later this year.

And hey, there’s going to be another manifesto developed! But not just out of a single mind, this will be (theoretically) the result of a crowdsourced process over the coming months. With a global coalition of organizations that (theoretically) will commit to realizing it.

I hope there’s some way for folks like me to get involved in this process, though. Seems focused (for now) on organizations.

Will follow this process closely. Let’s make it work!

Notepad++: A Very Special Software Update

I opened my Notepad++ text editor and got a most interesting surprise. It told me there was an update available, and did I want it? That’s not unusual; but what happened next certainly was.

The software quickly updated, and (again as usual) asked me if I wanted to run it. When it opened, the following text magically typed itself into a fresh file:

Notepad++ Je Suis Charlie ediiton

Notepad++ Je Suis Charlie edition

Pretty darn cool. I salute the Notepad++ team, and all who have taken a stand for free speech, free press and free expression.

Apparently the Notepad++ developers paid a small price for this tiny bit of courage. Read the linked article and the Related Articles below.

Je Suis Charlie: Long Live the Global Free Press!

Je Suis Charlie

Some random and probably disjointed thoughts on Wednesday’s events in Paris. As a onetime journalist (and a lifelong news junkie) I’m still a little numb.

Satire is a hard business. Just ask Jon Stewart, Bassem Youssef, or any Onion writer. Editorial cartooning is even harder, as it is part of the point to draw a hard and unmistakable line. I won’t pretend that I’ve ever read Charlie Hebdo, in translation or in French. Yet it’s clear that we must stand in solidarity with them, for they were brave and uncompromising.

My union is among the 35 journalism groups on board with Charlie:

Writers Groups Back Charlie HebdoDan Gillmor has tweeted a bunch of useful things today. Here’s my favorite:

My hometown newspaper, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, had two editorial cartoonists for years after the morning and afternoon papers merged. A year or so ago, they dumped the last full-timer, in favor of two syndicated editorial cartoons a day (usually one just left-of-center and the other just right-of-center). A month ago, they dropped the separate op-ed page and drastically cut the number of letters they published. Oh, and there’s just one syndicated cartoon left. It will probably be on the right side of free expression, but in a relatively bland and inoffensive way.

So spend some time with your favorite satirists today, and recommit to exercising your freedom of expression. Start a blog!

If you haven’t got a favorite satirist, you can start with a couple more of my favorite satirists (feel free to share your favorites in the Comments):

Book Review: “The Art of Social Media: Power Tips for Power Users”

Art of Social Media coverNow I know all of you already have Build Your Author Platform: The New Rules and gotten copies for all your friends and family who want to be successful writers. Perhaps you’re thinking “Mike, that book is seven months old! Isn’t there something more recent?” Yes, we’re all still on Internet time. Maybe you’re not a writer, but still want to master social media to build awareness of your business, your cause…maybe even your thirst for celebrity. I’ve got an idea for you.

The team of Guy Kawasaki and Peg Fitzpatrick have mastered social media as well as, or better than, just about anyone. It doesn’t hurt that Kawasaki is a tech marketing legend (Apple, Motorola and the like), but the 123 tips included in The Art of Social Media will be useful to anyone who wants to gather a following on the Internet.

Guy Kawasaki and Peg Fitzpatrick, authors of The Art of Social Media

Guy Kawasaki and Peg Fitzpatrick, authors of “The Art of Social Media”

This easy read (I think I knocked it out in 3-4 sessions) is less focused on services, but the principles shared will help you develop an overall social media strategy. When the Next Big Buzz social platform makes its appearance, you should be able to master it quickly.

This is not to say that you don’t learn a lot about Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, SlideShare, Google+ and Pinterest. You’ll pick up stuff about optimizing posts for each of these platforms, mastering the use of hashtags across services, and trying to understand how each platform adds stuff to your newsfeed.

Among the truths unlocked:

  • “There are only two kinds of people on social media: those who want more followers and those who are lying.”
  • The key to getting more followers? “Share Good Stuff”
  • Using social media to popularize events
  • Don’t just slap your presentation slides on SlideShare; make sure the slides are self-explanatory.

I am happy to say that Kawasaki and Fitzpatrick don’t contradict anything Carole Jelen and I said in Build Your Author Platform. I’ll also say that I learned things from this book. As a result, you may see more of me on Pinterest. You’ll learn new things too, no matter how far along you are in your social media journey.

Coming Attractions

A reasonable amount of planning went into the posts for National Blog Post Month this year. Since some of them didn’t quite get done, we’ve got some good stuff in the pipeline to share in the coming weeks. As a way to shamelessly beg to keep all my new readers around, here’s what’s coming up soon at Notes from the Metaverse:

  • What’s Next for Firefox? This weekend, Frederic Lardinois at TechCrunch asked this question. From one outsider to another, I’ve got some thoughts on this.
  • A more complete review of Firefox Developer Edition, following up on my earlier quick look.
  • Biosgraphy and ello: Two newcomers to the social/blogging arena.
  • Playing with text editors: Text editors are a religious matter for some developers. After using the programmable text editor Atom for a bit, I hope to have some useful things to say about it.
  • The new crop of electronic magazines covering Linux: Linux Voice, the
    English: Full Circle Magazine Logo

    Full Circle Magazine Logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    crowdsourced UK-based magazine is nearing its first anniversary. I’ve recently also become familiar with Full Circle Magazine (an Ubuntu-focused title) and FOSS Force.

  • Tux, the Linux penguin

    (Sorry, can’t ever resist) Tux, the Linux penguin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    I’ll still look for more community-based efforts (like the KDE Gardeners) to make free software better.

  • If my ambition to use all seven openSUSE Desktop Environment actually happens, I’ll surely write about it.

Usual disclaimers apply: Forward looking statements are not hard commitments. Other topics may intervene in the meantime. Also check MichaelMcCallister.com for posts about writing, building author platforms and the like.

Hope you have a terrific December!

Lessons from NaBloPoMo 2014

And so we come to the end of National Blog Post Month ). For the second year in a row, I (nearly) managed to post something here every day in November. Technically, this is Post #29 — there’s another one coming before the end of the day., where I commit to covering some of the technical topics I touched on this month. Last year, I finished the month with some lessons I learned; I’m going to do the same here. It’s not worth completing a challenge if you don’t learn something from it.
NaBloPoMo November 2014

By the way, if you’ve participated in NaBloPoMo, especially for the first time, I humbly suggest looking at that link to last year’s post. There’s some good stuff in there.

When choosing topics, social media is your friend

English: This icon, known as the "feed ic...

This icon, known as the “feed icon” or the “RSS icon” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I did a little more planning of topics this year (even though November snuck up on me again), but some of the better posts came as a result of reading other people’s stuff in my RSS feed and email. I even wrote one post that described my process, which was equal parts planning and serendipity.

While both BlogHer and WordPress.com offered topic prompts every day, I didn’t want to stray too far from the typical topics here just to complete a post. I’ll pat myself on the back, and declare that a good decision.

Y’all were interested in what I wrote

As with last year, NaBloPoMo raised the general interest in Notes from the Metaverse. The most popular posts from the last 30 days remained the technical ones:

Just one of these posts was not written this month. My Installing openSUSE 12.1 post from a while back is still pretty useful for v13.2, and I hope those who read it agree! All of these could be considered “technical,” and nearly all about open source software (though I don’t think the comet-lander was running KDE Plasma Desktop).

I also made some new friends this month. Welcome to all my new followers!

Y’all are too busy to comment

Notes from the Metaverse has always shrived to be an interactive space, where readers can comment on the material they read. It largely fails in that mission, but I understand. People are busy.

I am happy that some of you are getting comfortable with the Like button, though. Using that standard of popularity, here’s what you liked best:

Summing Up

I enjoy most of the process of NaBloPoMo, and will undoubtedly take part again next year. I think you should too. I’ll repeat myself just this once: Last year, I wrote (and stand by):

Congratulations to all those who successfully completed the NaBloPoMo challenge. To those who feel like they fell short: it’s really all about the effort. Life intervenes. But please keep on posting! Writing every day is essential for anyone who considers themselves a writer; blogging offers the opportunity to publish every day too–take advantage of this as often as you can!